Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Citing sources: MLA (Modern Language Association)

When and how to cite (and avoid accidental plagiarism!)

TCC's MLA style handouts

Here are some handouts (in both .docx and .pdf formats) featuring examples of citations for sources you might find through TCC's Library and the Web. This first handout is for the full works cited page. 

Works Cited

In-text citations

Video: How to create in-text and works-cited citations in MLA Style, 8th ed.

Watch this short video (3 mins, 38 seconds) to learn how to create both in-text and works-cited citations that adhere to the MLA Style (8th edition).

APA and MLA help for citing government documents

Government documents or reports -- from local, county, state, and/or national government departments -- are cited a little differently in both APA and MLA citation styles. For government documents or data, in most cases the author will be the government department responsible for compiling or publishing the data/report/document.

Examples for citing government documents:

Click the links below for good guides, with examples, for how to cite Census data, tax forms and other government documents.

What is MLA style?

MLA Style logoThe Modern Language Association (MLA) publishes a style guide used by authors who publish in the humanities. 

  • MLA style refers to both the physical appearance of your paper (type size, margins, running headers, etc.) and to the way you cite your sources, both in text and in your bibliography
  • Ensures consistency
  • Includes elements such as:
    • selection of headings, tone, and length;
    • punctuation and abbreviations;
    • presentation of numbers and statistics;
    • construction of tables and figures,
    • citation of sources both in-text and in a Works Cited page;
    • and many other elements that are a part of a manuscript.
  • You will collect the same information you would for an APA style bibliography (author, title, title of journal, date, etc.), but arrange it in a slightly different manner.
  • Remember than many of the Library's databases will provide an MLA citation that you can cut and paste.

MLA help links

Try these helpful sites that provide examples of citations for common sources, like books, e-books, and articles.

MLA fill-in-the-blank web forms ("citation builders")

Plug in the appropriate information in the following "citation builders" and view your citation in MLA format. Successful use depends upon entering the proper information! Compare your results with an MLA style handout (such as the one to the right).

MLA style books in the TCC Library

CC BY SA license

Except where otherwise noted, the content in these guides by Tacoma Community College Library is licensed under CC BY SA 4.0.
This openly licensed content allows others to cite, share, or modify this content, with credit to TCC Library. When reusing or adapting this content, include this statement in the new document: This content was originally created by Tacoma Community College Library and shared with a CC BY SA 4.0 license.

Tacoma Community College Library - Building 7, 6501 South 19th Street, Tacoma, WA 98466 - P. 253.566.5087