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Reading Apprenticeship at TCC: TCC faculty takeaways from 2016 RA conference

TCC faculty guide about reading apprenticeship resources and techniques

Thoughts from the Reading Apprenticeship Metacognition and Mindfulness Conference

Reading Apprenticeship conference posterAround 17 of our colleagues attended the 2016 Reading Apprenticeship Metacognition and Mindfulness Conference at Renton Technical College. We had useful times in sessions - Applying Reading Apprenticeship to online classes, to peer-review, in the library, to STEM, to 2nd language and pre-college classrooms,... and much more

And we had good times out of session - good food and drink, conversations, caricature artists, winning iPads,...

Below are TCC faculty takeaways from the 2016 Reading Apprenticeship Metacognition and Mindfulness Conference at Renton Technical College. 

Pattie Green's "golden line"

"...what struck me most during the conference, is that while we were focused on reading text, that these techniques would work well to ‘read’ figures and graphs. My students struggle with deciphering non-text content, and although it is a different type of reading, using the Reading Apprentice strategies might help teach them to understand a complex figure or the many graphs they see in a science class."

Allison Muir's "golden line"

"...my big take away was a bigger understanding of schema. The need to help students build vocabulary and experience in new discourses is only part of a much bigger picture. We also need to help students recognize the schema they come to class with, how they built it and how that influences their interaction with the content. We need to explicitly teach schema in a way that helps students identify the lenses through which they perceive the world so that they can identify for themselves both the benefits and limitations of their perspective and think critically about their own thinking."

Melissa Adams' "golden line"

"A research problem is a reading problem." Zoey Fisher, Pierce College Library
Most of the time when working with a student on a research task, reading plays a huge role along the entire process - sometimes students get stuck because they don't have enough reading strategy experience. Librarians are every bit as much reading instructors as they are research instructors - by necessity.

Kim Harrington's "golden line"

"I’m looking forward to trying “Talk to the Text” with my science major students in helping them to read primary scientific literature."

What is a "golden line"?

In Reading Apprenticeship the "golden line" encourages readers to engage with material at a personal experience level: Traditional definition of a golden line is "a line of text that is especially meaningful, surprising, helpful or thought provoking" to the reader. However, the golden line can also be applied to other types of materials, such as a powerful take-away from a conference!

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